Matt and Mike talk with a bevy of bots who are presenting on Wednesday at DrupalCon Seattle.

Speaker Session title Wednesday Timeslot Room
Jeft Eaton Personalization for the Perplexed 10:30 am - 11:05 am Room 2A
Karen Stevenson AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) Re-Imagined 1:45 pm - 2:15 pm Room 612
Greg Dunlap Enterprise Content Inventories 2:30 pm - 3:00 pm Room 606
Mateu Aguiló Bosch Why Will JSON:API Go into Core? 2:30 pm - 3:00 pm Room 612
Ezequiel Vázquez Autopsy of Vulnerabilities 3:15 pm - 3:45 pm Room 606
Marc Drummond Diversity & Inclusion: Building a Stronger Drupal Community 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm Room 618
Sally Young Drupal Admin UI 5:30 pm - 6:00 pm Room 6C

We will be releasing a podcast detailing Lullabot's Thursday DrupalCon sessions next Thursday, April 4th, 2019.

Can you edit that out? I really regret saying that. — Greg Dunlap

This Episode's Guests

Karen Stevenson

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Karen is one of Drupal's great pioneers, co-creating the Content Construction Kit (CCK) which has become Field UI, part of Drupal core.

Greg Dunlap

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Greg has been involved with Drupal for 8+ years, specializing in configuration management and deployment issues.

Ezequiel Vázquez

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Zequi is a developer specialized on backend, with strong background on DevOps, love for automation and huge passion for information security,

Joe Shindelar

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Joe Shindelar is now the Lead Developer and Lead Trainer at Drupalize.Me (launched by Lullabot and now an Osio Labs company).

Marc Drummond

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Senior front-end developer passionate about responsive web design, web standards, accessibility, Drupal and more. Let's make the web great for everyone!

Sally Young

Sally Young
Senior Technical Architect working across the full-stack and specialising in decoupled architectures. Core JavaScript maintainer for Drupal, as well as leading the JavaScript Modernization Initiative.
Transcript

Transcript

Matt Kleve:
March 28, 2019, it's the Lullabot Podcast.
Matt Kleve:
Hey everybody it's the Lullabot Podcast, episode 233, I'm Matt Kleve, a Senior Developer of Lullabot. With me as always is the cohost of the show, Senior Front End Dev, Mike Herchel. Hey, Mike.
Mike Herchel:
Hey, Matt.
Matt Kleve:
The rain in America falls mainly in Seattle.
Mike Herchel:
It's going to be beautiful while we're up there, though. I feel it. It's gonna be sunny. The rain's gonna be down in California, and it's gonna be sunny in Seattle.
Matt Kleve:
It's gonna rain in California?
Mike Herchel:
Yes. It's been raining in California.
Matt Kleve:
You know, I don't know what the weather is gonna be like, but I can guarantee you that DrupalCon is gonna be sunny, and I'm excited to be there.
Mike Herchel:
It's gonna be awesome. I'm excited.
Matt Kleve:
Two days of sessions, as traditional Drupal developers understand it. And today we have a bunch of Lullabots who are talking on the first day of sessions, and we're gonna hear all about it.
Mike Herchel:
Yep, that would be Wednesday. The Wednesday of session, we are gonna talk with all of the Lullabots, or at least most of the Lullabots that are presenting that day. We're gonna give kinda a run down of the sessions and we're just gonna talk about what's exciting about DrupalCon for everyone.
Matt Kleve:
So we're gonna give everybody whose speaking a chance to pitch their session, just a couple minutes. The elevator speech. And I do want this to be a little bit interactive, since we have a bunch of people on the call, it's kinda hard to keep everybody straight, but if you do have a question for somebody or wanna kinda understand what they're gonna talk about further, jump in please.
Mike Herchel:
Yep.
Matt Kleve:
So who am I talking about? Who's here?
Mike Herchel:
Alright, so the first person ... let's talk about who's not here that's presenting. So the first person that is not here is a Senior Digital Strategist for here at Lullabot, the one and only Jeff Eaton who is, I believe at a [crosstalk 00:01:52]
Matt Kleve:
I believe he's onsite with a client.
Mike Herchel:
Yeah, he's at a client onsite or Japan or traveling today and we're gonna have another Content Strategist, Greg Dunlap talk about Eaton's session along with his own.
Matt Kleve:
On that note, hi Greg.
Mike Herchel:
Yeah, hi, Greg.
Greg Dunlap:
Hey, how's it going?
Matt Kleve:
Glad you're here.
Greg Dunlap:
I'm glad to be here, with all of you fine folks.
Mike Herchel:
What is the title of your session?
Greg Dunlap:
The title of my session ... that's a good question. What is the title of my session? Enterprise Content Inventories.
Matt Kleve:
Cool. Also with us today we have Lullabot CTO, Karen Stevenson. Hi, Karen.
Karen Stevenson:
Hey there.
Matt Kleve:
Karen, what are you talking about?
Karen Stevenson:
I'm talking about AMP ... re-imagining AMP.
Matt Kleve:
AMP, the Accelerated Mobile Pages, Google stuff.
Karen Stevenson:
Correct, yeah. Not Google AMP, just AMP.
Matt Kleve:
AMP, okay.
Mike Herchel:
You're drinking the Kool-Aid there, Karen.
Karen Stevenson:
I know.
Mike Herchel:
Alright, next up we got Zeqi, who is talking about an Autopsy of Vulnerability.
Matt Kleve:
You can just let him say that.
Mike Herchel:
Zeqi, what are you talking about?
Zequi Vázquez:
Hey. I am talking Autopsy of Vulnerabilities. It's basically dissecting and analyzing how two of the biggest, more famous vulnerabilities on Drupal work.
Mike Herchel:
Yeah, and you're a Senior Developer here at Lullabot, and you reside in Spain, correct?
Zequi Vázquez:
Yeah, that's correct.
Matt Kleve:
And on the website it says that it's Ezeqiel Vaázquez, but we say Zeqi.
Zequi Vázquez:
Which is shorter.
Mike Herchel:
Alight, so next up, we have a Senior Front End Developer here at Lullabot, Marc Drummond. What're you talking about Marc?
Marc Drummond:
Hi. So, I'm in a group presentation. We're talking about diversity and inclusion and building a stronger Drupal community. So this is for the Drupal Diversity & Inclusion Work Group and we're gonna be having a long session to talk about lots of things about diversity and inclusion, and the work that we're doing within the Drupal community.
Mike Herchel:
That sounds fantastic.
Matt Kleve:
Also with us we, have senior technical architect, Sally Young. Hey, Sally.
Sally Young:
Hello.
Mike Herchel:
Coming to us from the U.K. So what are you gonna be talking about at DrupalCon.
Sally Young:
So, I'm actually first going to be talking at the Decoupled Summit, which I'm helping to run on the Tuesday, so I hope that's okay to put a plug in for that ...
Matt Kleve:
Of course.
Sally Young:
... We have some fantastic speakers coming along including people from GatsbyJS so that's going to be really exciting. Then I have a talk coming up on the Drupal Admin UI. So if you're interested in that initiative, it's going to be a big update on what we've been up to.
Sally Young:
Now, it was formally known as the JavaScript Modernization Initiative but we clubbed together with the Admin UI people, so we're now we're one big, happy initiative.
Matt Kleve:
Very cool.
Mike Herchel:
So that's fantastic. Let's talk about one other person that we're missing here. We're missing Mateu Bosch, who is talking about Why Will JSON API Go Into Core?
Greg Dunlap:
Isn't that too late?
Matt Kleve:
I was gonna say, isn't that past tense now?
Mike Herchel:
Alright, so maybe we can strike his ... Why Is JSON API ...
Matt Kleve:
Why did, maybe?
Mike Herchel:
Why did? Yeah. Alright.
Mike Herchel:
Sally, what is ...
Sally Young:
Am I have to pretend to be Mateu.
Matt Kleve:
Yeah, you have to talk with a Spanish accent if you can manage this.
Sally Young:
Catalonian accent, which I can't do ... but I can tell you ... just imagine me laying in a hammock in a beautiful seaside setting.
Sally Young:
I believe in this talk he's going to tell you why they went with JSON API as opposed to working on some other things that were already in core, such as REST, or some of the other models available like GraphQL and then, I suspect he will cover lots of his experiences on actually getting the thing in.
Mike Herchel:
[crosstalk 00:06:02] That all sounds fantastic, Mateu, thank you.
Sally Young:
You're welcome.
Matt Kleve:
Mike, we can't forget we have one more friend on the call. The Lead Developer and trainer at Osio Labs, we have Joe Shindelar. Hey, Joe.
Joe Shindelar:
Hey, friends.
Matt Kleve:
And you may know it as Drupalize.Me, I suppose.
Joe Shindelar:
Yeah, that's probably the lowest common denominator.
Matt Kleve:
What's your talk called?
Joe Shindelar:
I'm gonna be talking about Gatsby and Drupal. Sally just mentioned GatsbyJS which is a ... essentially it's an application generator they use as React to allow you to create super fast websites, and I'm gonna be talking about that.
Matt Kleve:
Mike, since Sally plugged the Summit, I'm gonna give you the opportunity to do it too.
Mike Herchel:
Yes, yes.
Sally Young:
Oh, you're gonna plug my summit for me, Mike, thank you.
Matt Kleve:
No, Mike is plugging his own summit. Mike is speaking at another summit.
Mike Herchel:
As is Nate Lampton. Nate and I are both talking about ... we're talking at the Performance and Scalability Summit which is happening at the Monday of DrupaCon, and I'm gonna talk a little about ... I'm gonna talk a lot about front-end website performance.
Mike Herchel:
To tell you the truth, I don't know what Nate's gonna talk about, but it's gonna be pretty awesome, because Nate's pretty awesome.
Matt Kleve:
Probably some of that other performance and scalability stuff.
Mike Herchel:
Yeah. Nate is, in my opinion, one of the world's foremost experts on scaling pretty much any Drupal type of website. He's worked a lot with the Grammy's, Tesla and a lot of other very big, well-known names, scaling them to make sure they can meet the demands of browsers.
Matt Kleve:
No we know who's here, let's hear a little bit more about what they have to say.
Mike Herchel:
The first Lullabot talk on Wednesday is actually Jeff Eaton, which is personalization for the perplexed, and that is at 10:30am, and it runs until 11:05am, so it looks like 35 minutes. Since Greg Dunlap is the only Content Strategist that we have on the call, Greg, do you wanna say something about that? Maybe wave your arms around?
Greg Dunlap:
Yeah, sure. I do wave my arms around a lot. It's the only way that my FitBit thinks that I'm exercising is when I'm waving my arms around on conference calls.
Greg Dunlap:
Jeff's going ... the first thing I should point out about this is that Jeff is going to be speaking in the marketing track. This year there are kind of three DrupalCons. There's the Builder DrupalCon, and the Marketing DrupalCon, and I forget what the third one is. Who knows what the third one is?
Matt Kleve:
I don't know. I remember the registration page made me scratch my head a little bit.
Greg Dunlap:
Anyway.
Mike Herchel:
I think it's the agency leaders, right? Does that sound about right to you?
Greg Dunlap:
Sure. And so, Jeff is speaking at the marketing DrupalCon, so that's an important thing to know. You need the ticket for the marketing DrupalCon to see Jeff speak. It's probably worth the price of that ticket just to see Eaton speak because he's awesome.
Greg Dunlap:
His session is called Personalization for the Perplexed. What it's about is ... you know, personalization is a really hot topic in the CMS world these days, and Adobe comes out and pitches you on their personalization stuff, and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. We see a lot of our clients get that stuff, and then be completely kerflummoxed about what to do with it, or how to best use it, or what the best approaches are.
Greg Dunlap:
He's going to give a kind of laying down ... here's the four ways that personalization can be brought to bear on your site, and here are the common pitfalls that we usually see clients run into with that. I also know he's going to be doing some stuff about here's where crystallization can go really bad, not just from a technical or business standpoint, but also from a societal standpoint because personalization taken to it's extreme can have a lot of sort of ethical and weird outcomes. He's going to be talking about that as well.
Greg Dunlap:
I don't have envy him for having to fit all that stuff into 35 minutes, but I'm sure whatever it is will be thoughtful and well put-together, and I'm sure that people will learn a lot from it.
Matt Kleve:
Thanks. Greg, have you ever been on a project that's implemented any of this personalization stuff?
Greg Dunlap:
We've been on lots of projects that have talked about it.
Greg Dunlap:
A lot of people high hopes and dreams for it but one of the things ... and I don't want to steal Eaton's thunder here ... well, I won't steal Eaton's thunder. There are a lot of problems that can come along with it, and it takes a lot of work, and I think that's one of the things that people don't really understand a lot of the times when they get into it, because for every segment you're personalizing for, you need content for that segment and more and more segments you're personalizing for, the more and more content you need. We usually pitch clients to go slow and steady and see what's working for them.
Matt Kleve:
This seems like one of those promises that's been hanging in the web world for quite a while now.
Greg Dunlap:
Yeah, almost as long as VR and stuff. It's like one of those things that keeps coming up over, over, and over again, almost since the web has begun.
Greg Dunlap:
I think there are some industries where it's working out really well, but there are industries in which the amount of work you do to put in that massive amount of personalization pays off at the end. Think about financial industry and stuff like that, that's where things can happen.
Greg Dunlap:
But if you're talking about your typical ad-driven website, then I think there's stuff that could be brought to bear, but probably not in this ... not in the way that CMS vendors are selling their personalization stuff to you.
Mike Herchel:
Matt, this sounds like a very popular podcast topic.
Matt Kleve:
It does. We should have him back on, huh?
Mike Herchel:
Yeah.
Greg Dunlap:
I think that would be great.
Joe Shindelar:
You need to.
Greg Dunlap:
You should probably have Eaton back on, and then I'll just listen to the podcast.
Mike Herchel:
Alright, next up on your Wednesday schedule is our director of operations. Is that right, Karen?
Karen Stevenson:
No.
Mike Herchel:
No?
Matt Kleve:
Chief Technology.
Karen Stevenson:
Technology.
Matt Kleve:
CTO.
Karen Stevenson:
Seth is the director of operations.
Mike Herchel:
Well, I get you two confused all the time.
Karen Stevenson:
I know. We look alike. People have a lot of trouble telling us apart.
Mike Herchel:
So you're presenting on AMP at 1:45pm, all the way to 2:15pm. Can you tell us a little bit about your presentation?
Karen Stevenson:
Sure, so AMP is something I've always been interested in. I was interested in it when we started doing this ... I think it was three years ago when they first rolled the initial thing out ... and we were involved in developing the initial AMP application.
Karen Stevenson:
At the time nobody quite knew what was going to come out of this, I think including Google, and so the early idea was that you tag a few news pages and you create an AMP version of those news pages. It's just like, super simple, it's just the content on the page, nothing else, and you make it really slick and fast, and that's it. And that's all there is. But AMP has come a long, long way since that.
Karen Stevenson:
AMP actually includes components that do all kinds of crazy things. I mean, there are AMP components that do everything. You can even have sites that are completely AMP. It's not like a different page, it's the original page.
Karen Stevenson:
So there's all this crazy new stuff out there, and there are people that are interested in it, and doing it, but our original implementation of Drupal AMP didn't support any of that kind of thing. I got interest in it ... just personally I was interested ... I went to some of the Google conferences and have been talking to people ... I said "well, if we just kind of redid this from scratch, how could I incorporate some of this stuff?"
Karen Stevenson:
That's what the 8.3 branch of AMP is. Let's just start over, looking at AMP as it is today, and if you wanna implement AMP and you wanna do some of this crazy stuff, how would you go about it? That's what this whole branch is, and that's what I'm gonna talk about, is all the stuff that I've been trying to do, including making a theme that actually looks like your regular theme instead of a completely different, dumbed down version of your theme.
Karen Stevenson:
I figured out a way to use Drupal's built in capability for managing CSS so that it writes the CSS into the page, instead of as links, which is one of the AMP ...
Mike Herchel:
Neat.
Karen Stevenson:
... requirements. And keeps track of what's the size of your CSS so you can figure out whether you're staying within the 50,000 kilobyte limits.
Karen Stevenson:
There's all kinds of other things. Someone else is working on CSS tree shaking which now automatically shakes it down. We just got that in the last day or two. Really interesting stuff going on here. And, all the AMP components will actually work on any page, though you could build a site of AMP components, and you wouldn't have one thing for the AMP page and a different thing for your regular site.
Karen Stevenson:
If you like them, they work, so it's just a complete re-imagining of the whole thing, and that's what this is about.
Mike Herchel:
Gotcha. And so the name of the session is AMP: Accelerated Mobile Pages Re-imagined, and that's at 1:45pm to 2:15pm.
Matt Kleve:
Sure. Well next up on our schedule we have Senior Digital Strategist Greg Dunlap. Hey Greg. We've heard from you already.
Greg Dunlap:
Hey, how's it going.
Matt Kleve:
He played Eaton earlier, so.
Greg Dunlap:
I did.
Matt Kleve:
So you'll be speaking about Enterprise Content Inventories.
Greg Dunlap:
Yeah, so earlier ... not earlier this year ... last year Eaton, myself and one of our Senior UX designers, Marissa Epstein did a big content strategy gig for the State of Georgia, and as a part of that we had to do an inventory and analysis of the content across 85 of their agency websites.
Greg Dunlap:
This session is about how we decided to approach that, the tools that we ended up using to make it happen, and what we did with that data once we had it, and sort of lessons learned and tips to go forward and that sort of thing.
Matt Kleve:
Neat.
Mike Herchel:
I saw Greg's session at Drupal GovCon this past year, and honestly it was one of my favorite sessions during the conference. And I'm coming in as a friend and developer, but it's very, very interesting topic in my opinion.
Greg Dunlap:
Yeah, this will largely be the same session, except it's shorter, so I have to speed it up a little bit. I'm just gonna have to talk really fast.
Mike Herchel:
Good luck with that.
Greg Dunlap:
Thanks.
Mike Herchel:
Alright, the next session scheduled on your schedule is Mateu's session, which is Why Will JSON API Go Into Core?
Matt Kleve:
And it better be on your schedule.
Mike Herchel:
And it better be on your schedule.
Matt Kleve:
That's right.
Mike Herchel:
That's starting right at 2:30 and it's going all the way to 3:00, and impersonating Mateu, once again we're gonna have, Sally Young.
Matt Kleve:
So, Sally with your knowledge of decoupled and the world and plus, it's kind of the way of Drupal these days, if it's useful put it in core, why will JSON API go into core? Or why did it?
Sally Young:
Why did it go into core?
Sally Young:
I think they'll cover a bit ... I'm totally guessing now ... they'll cover some of that ... I think they talked about this a lot in their previous sessions about why they would want a config-free API solution to go into core. One of the things I personally found quite frustrating about the Rest module is that if you're a new user and you're not used to Drupal and you have all these promises of API endpoints, you'd go in and try to make something it's actually kind of difficult.
Sally Young:
JSON API, you can turn it on and all of a suddenly you have all these API endpoints, and it's pretty set and forget which is nice. I guess they'll cover some of that, and possibly they might go into some of the challenges of just getting it ... a big feature into Drupal core, and all of the processes that are kind of around core development which should be quite interesting.
Matt Kleve:
The whole "it's config free" thing, I thought was a total load of crap until I actually did it, and then I was like "really, there was no config, that's awesome."
Sally Young:
Yeah. It totally works.
Mike Herchel:
Yeah, it's pretty cool. I also wanna mention that Mateu is going to be giving this session along with Wim Leers and Gabe Sullice who are all maintainers of the subsystem within Drupal.
Sally Young:
Yeah, and I'd also mentioned the Admin UT Initiative wouldn't really be possible without it because we can have this module here that we can will provide us all the things that are actually Drupal. We don't have to worry about it too much. Which is great because then we say you want to use this Admin UI just turn this module on not, if you want to use the Admin UI, first you have to go and configure all of these things, and never misconfigure them ever.
Mike Herchel:
Has there been a lot of back and forth with the Admin UI team finding various different issues, and the API first team fixing them, et cetera?
Sally Young:
Not lately. And maybe I'll just talk about my session now and why. With the Admin UI initiative because the JavaScript part of it is going to be such a fundamental shift in how you might make a module appear or something in the admin interface of Drupal, it's gonna take a while to ship, and we didn't want to not ship anything for a while because Drupal's admin interface is looking a little bit tired, I think, compared to some of the other things out there that have evolved.
Mike Herchel:
I agree.
Sally Young:
And that's really frustrating because when we want to show Drupal to people, and potential users, I think their judgment can get clouded by the styles not being as modern, or in the style that they're used to of modern web apps.
Sally Young:
And it's not that the functionality isn't there, it can do all these complex thing with multilingual and whatnot, but they don't really see it. So a lot focus on the Admin UI initiative right now has shifted over to making a new theme for Drupal 8, with it's current theme system. So the new theme is called Claro, and it has this beautiful new design system that was headed up by Cristina Chumillas and lots of other great people working on that.
Sally Young:
We will reuse the design system and components that were built for that for the JavaScript admin UI. So going back to your original question, there was a lot more back and forth going on but that's on a bit of a pause right now.
Mike Herchel:
Gotcha, so you're talking about your session. Your session is later in the day at 5:30-6:00, and you're talking about Decoupled Summit and Drupal Admin UI. Are you gonna be showing demos of what everything's looking like and the current status of this?
Sally Young:
Yes, we will.
Zequi Vázquez:
That's gonna be popular.
Sally Young:
I hope so. We'll show you the JavaScript UI, which I said is taking a bit of a backseat to Claro right now, but we'll show you around Claro and all the work that's been going on there.
Mike Herchel:
That's pretty cool. I feel like they scheduled you later in the day just to keep people around, because everybody's gonna wanna go to this one.
Sally Young:
Awe, that's nice.
Sally Young:
I think, it has not been finalized yet, but I will be doing a talk that has maybe a little bit more historical background to it as well during the Decoupled Summit, so if you're interested in that, please come along. And I can even get in another plug for Jeff Eaton here who is also coming to speak at the Decoupled Summit. He's doing a talk on designer's data, and that talks about when editorial control meets decoupled content, so that should be really interesting.
Mike Herchel:
It's an interesting topic.
Sally Young:
Yes. One of the things we'll probably talk about during our session is preview, because a lot of stuff that happened at our initiative got a little bit sidetracked by this particular issue which we decided to put aside for right now because it's quite complicated, so. Come along to the session to hear about that, but Jeff Eaton's also probably going to talk about some stuff related to that as well in his talk which is more from the content strategy side.
Mike Herchel:
Gotcha. So those two sessions are ... first we talked about Mateu's session which is Why Did JSON API Go Into Core? Which is 2:30 to 3:00pm, and then the last session on your Wednesday schedule is Sally's which is the Drupal Admin UI session that's 5:30 to 6:00 and you should get there early so you can grab a chair.
Matt Kleve:
We're half way through the list ... probably a little over a half way since we did that last one. You know what that means?
Mike Herchel:
It's time to take a break.
Matt Kleve:
Yeah, it's time to take a break. Hey, you know but after this we're gonna hear all about Drupal security, we're gonna hear about GatsbyJS and we're going to hear about building a stronger Drupal community, all on your DrupalCon Seattle sessions day one, more after this.
Liz Trudeau:
Hi. This is Liz Trudeau from the Drupal Association.
Liz Trudeau:
DrupalCon Seattle is the conference where cutting edge content, networking and contributing come together. Meet thousands of users, developers and designers using Drupal. Level up your skills, April 8th through the 12th at the Washington State Convention Center. events.drupal.org.
Matt Kleve:
Hey, joining us now is Helen Porter, account executive at Lullabot. Hey, Helen.
Helen Porter:
Hey there.
Matt Kleve:
We don't ever get together.
Helen Porter:
I know, we don't get to talk often enough.
Matt Kleve:
But soon we'll all be together.
Helen Porter:
Yeah. Can't wait.
Matt Kleve:
We're going to DrupalCon Seattle.
Helen Porter:
We are indeed, it's coming right up.
Matt Kleve:
And Lullabot is gonna have a booth there, right at the Expo hall?
Helen Porter:
We sure all. We've got booths number 307 -
Matt Kleve:
What does that mean? People talk about conferences and it's like, "come visit us at 307."
Helen Porter:
I don't know. I think there's a map that appears somewhere in the conference materials, but we'll have a nice spot. I think our next door booth neighbors are gonna be Pantheon and we're across from Platform SH, so. We'll be easy to spot.
Matt Kleve:
What is our booth gonna look like? Is it like, corporate and stodgy?
Helen Porter:
I wouldn't say it's corporate and stodgy. I'd say it's pretty chill, and welcoming. We've got couches, we'll probably have a coffee table. We'll have some awesome Lullabot swag, t-shirts and such.
Matt Kleve:
So I hear there's something happening on Tuesday night.
Helen Porter:
Yeah there is. We're having our annual DrupalCon party on Tuesday night. It's actually starting right after the opening reception in the Exhibit Hall, so you can walk straight over from there.
Matt Kleve:
And it's called the Come As You Are party. Kind of a tribute to Nirvana, being Seattle and all, right?
Helen Porter:
Yeah.
Matt Kleve:
So Mike has to sing.
Mike Herchel:
Hold on, hold on, hold on. Come as you are ... as you were ...
Matt Kleve:
There it is.
Mike Herchel:
As I want you to be.
Matt Kleve:
And we just want you to be there, right? Because you're always our friends if you come to the Lullabot party at DrupalCon.
Helen Porter:
It's gonna be so much fun. It's at this cool bar called Garage that has bowling alleys and pool tables, and we're gonna have board games. It's gonna be awesome.
Mike Herchel:
Oh nice. Yeah. And you it's within walking distance.
Helen Porter:
I think it's only about a half mile walk from the convention center so it should it convenient.
Matt Kleve:
And literally, come as you are. No need to have an invite or anything. We'd love to have you there.
Helen Porter:
Yeah, everyone's welcome. All you need is your DrupalCon badge. No RSVP or anything like that.
Mike Herchel:
Cool. Thanks for coming on and telling us all about it, Helen.
Helen Porter:
Sure, thanks for having me. I'll see you in Seattle.
Mike Herchel:
Welcome back, we're talking about day one of DrupalCon Seattle. This is Wednesday's sessions.
Matt Kleve:
And it's day one, but it's kinda day three. It kinda depends when your DrupalCon starts.
Mike Herchel:
Yeah, yeah, there's bunch of awesome summits.
Matt Kleve:
There's training and summits happening on Mondays and Tuesdays. Monday and Tuesday, I guess, and then sessions, as you know DrupalCon, Wednesday, Thursday, right?
Mike Herchel:
Yeah. That's right. And then we have an awesome contribution sprint on Friday, and don't you dare call it a code sprint.
Matt Kleve:
That's right. Because you're gonna contribute, darn it.
Mike Herchel:
I'm not even sure if we're supposed to call it sprints anymore. It's like a contribution day, I'm honestly not quite sure.
Sally Young:
Like a meander.
Matt Kleve:
Running is hard.
Karen Stevenson:
No sprinting allowed.
Mike Herchel:
That's pretty awesome.
Mike Herchel:
Alright, next up talking about his session is Senior Developer Zeqi who is presenting on the Autopsy of Vulnerabilities at 3:15 to 3:45 on Wednesday. Hey Zeqi.
Zequi Vázquez:
So, my session was born when a friend from the Spanish community asked me, we are developers and operators, whenever a security patch for Drupal core or Drupal [inaudible 00:28:23] comes, we just run and apply the patch but we never stop think about how this patch works? Or how the vulnerability works, and how the patch prevents it for being exploited.
Zequi Vázquez:
It would be nice if someone explained, this kind of things. What, basically my head was bubbling, and I said "yeah, why not."
Zequi Vázquez:
So I will be dissecting SA-CORE-2014-005 which was this SQL injection discovered on October ... or it was patched on October, 2014, and also the one from the Remote Code Execution from the past year, patched it on March 28th, if I remember correctly.
Zequi Vázquez:
The session will be analyzing each of these vulnerabilities just in three steps. First, I will describe the components of the technology of Drupal itself that are involved and they usual behave, or should be.
Zequi Vázquez:
Then the second step is describing the vulnerability itself ... once we have described how the component works, we will now describe how the failure, how the error produces the ability to exploit the vulnerability, and also I will describe the effects, the consequences of being ... of having a successful exploitation there and then, the third and last step for both vulnerabilities will be a live demo that I will have prepared to show everyone how easy they are exploited, and that's basically it.
Mike Herchel:
That sounds really, really fascinating.
Zequi Vázquez:
Yeah, I really enjoyed the time when I when prepared both the demos and the presentation. It's really fun.
Mike Herchel:
Yeah. Alright
Matt Kleve:
So a live demo like, we're gonna see how these vulnerabilities can actually be exploited?
Zequi Vázquez:
Yes. Of course this will be on my local. I have prepared a couple of the correct containers. I am not going to exploit any real site, but, yes, they are actual virtual machines containing only Drupal core versions which are affected by the vulnerabilities. That's it. No modifications and nothing else.
Matt Kleve:
What color hat do you have on?
Zequi Vázquez:
Sorry what?
Matt Kleve:
What color of hat do you have on?
Zequi Vázquez:
I would say in public, I am a white hat hacker.
Mike Herchel:
In public. See how he ... qualified that there. He gets at home and he puts on his hoodie and he stares at his screen in a dark room.
Matt Kleve:
And just for clarity's sake, just wanted to say it one more time. I know Zeqi already said it, but these are older vulnerabilities, so update your code.
Sally Young:
He needs to wear a ski mask. In Germany every time there's a hacker depicted in the media, 100% always wearing a ski mask.
Mike Herchel:
That's pretty awesome.
Matt Kleve:
It's not a Guy Fawkes mask?
Sally Young:
No, no. Not in Germany. Just the ski mask.
Mike Herchel:
I think in the U.S. they're in hoodies.
Karen Stevenson:
As if they're at home in a ski mask on doing it, right?
Sally Young:
Exactly, yep.
Matt Kleve:
That's because it's cold.
Mike Herchel:
So once again, that's Autopsy of Vulnerabilities at 3:15 to 3:45 on Wednesday.
Matt Kleve:
Deal. And also with us today is Joe Shindelar. Hey, Joe.
Joe Shindelar:
Hey Matt.
Matt Kleve:
Joe from Osio Labs, Drupalize.Me. He's going to be talking about Gatsby.
Joe Shindelar:
I am.
Matt Kleve:
So, Leonardo DiCaprio, Robert Redford, F. Scott Fitzgerald ... it's all good.
Mike Herchel:
And [inaudible 00:32:20]
Joe Shindelar:
Yes and no. I'm gonna be talking about GatsbyJS.
Matt Kleve:
Oh crap, yes.
Joe Shindelar:
Commonly abbreviated as Gatsby. Gatsby is a tool for building web applications using React and various other technologies. Sort of the promise of Gatsby is that you can build really fast applications, and in theory, Gatsby makes it hard to build slow applications. I've been thinking about this a little bit.
Joe Shindelar:
I've given the presentation a couple of times and now it's a 30 minute time slot and so I feel like I'm doing all of this tree shaking and scope hoisting and trying to reconfigure my presentation so I can appropriately fit it into a 30 minute time slot, instead of the longer version.
Joe Shindelar:
There are a handful of other people talking about Gatsby at DrupalCon. There are trainings about it, there are people talking about it at the Decoupled Summit, there are other presentations about it.
Joe Shindelar:
I think the thing that is going to, in part, differentiate from the others the most is I'm gonna spend a bunch of time talking about how, when you build a website with Gatsby, you're actually building a full React application, which means they can do anything that React can do. It's not just a static website generator.
Joe Shindelar:
I'm gonna talk about how you can use Gatsby in conjunction with Drupal and modules like Simple OF to provide authentication for your applications and personalization and some things like that which I think should be pretty fun.
Joe Shindelar:
I'll also talk a bit about how ... why I think Gatsby is an interesting tool for people who are using Drupal in part. I think it's a really great way to learn React and GraphQL, both of which are are hot topics at the moment and useful skills to learn.
Joe Shindelar:
In my experience it's always so much easier to learn something when you've got real data to work with and a real application to build. One of the things that's cool about Gatsby and it's ability to pull content in from Drupal is that you've got real content to work with right out of the box, and you don't spend a bunch of time just creating a bunch of lorem ipsum for your application. For me, that's made the learning experience of learning React and GraphQL much more pleasant.
Mike Herchel:
Fantastic. So, hey, are you giving a training this year?
Joe Shindelar:
Yeah, I'm helping to facilitate a training on Tuesday. Amber Matz and I will be teaching Drupal 8 theming. It's sold out already, so unfortunately you can't get any seats for it, but we're super excited to each it, and it'll be good.
Mike Herchel:
Awesome.
Matt Kleve:
That sounds like fun. Gatsby's a pretty hot topic. I'm excited to hear from you, Joe.
Matt Kleve:
If you wanna know more about Gatsby you can go back to the Lullabot Podcast library and in August of last year we talked to the GatsbyGS creator, Kyle Matthews, right Mike?
Mike Herchel:
That is correct, yes.
Greg Dunlap:
This new focus on Gatsby is really interesting. I studied F. Scott Fitzgerald in college but I really hadn't heard much about him since then.
Mike Herchel:
Well now, now you have.
Matt Kleve:
That's pretty good.
Greg Dunlap:
No it's not. Can you edit that out? I really regret saying it.
Mike Herchel:
Nope.
Matt Kleve:
I already made an F. Scott Fitzgerald joke so.
Greg Dunlap:
Did you? I missed it. Gah.
Karen Stevenson:
He did.
Sally Young:
That just makes it even better.
Mike Herchel:
Alight, so last. Last but not least, we have Senior Front End Developer, Marc Drummond talking about diversity and inclusion, building a stronger Drupal community. This is 4:00 on Wednesday, all the way to 5:30. So this an hour and a half session, which is gonna be pretty awesome. Tell us all about it Marc.
Marc Drummond:
Great. So we are hopefully gonna have a really wonderful session to ... this is a great session to come and learn what diversity and inclusion is all about. This is ... you don't have to be somebody who already knows a lot about diversity and inclusion. You can come in from the ground floor and learn about things like privilege and intersectionality.
Marc Drummond:
If you've heard terms like but you're like, "I don't exactly know what people are talking about with those things." We'll help explain what those things are. We are gonna just help share a lot of information. Talk about things like bias and how there's bias in software and in communities and talk about that in tech and in the Drupal community in specific ... what our group, the Drupal Diversity & Inclusion Group has been trying to do and has been working on. We've been working for the last several years to do a lot of different things in the community and we're gonna share a lot of those activities and ways that people can get involved, and we're really excited to share all of that. And we hope that a lot of people will stop on by and hopefully we're gonna have some really good conversations and have a welcoming discussion.
Mike Herchel:
Yeah, it's a very, very important topic. Who are you presenting with?
Marc Drummond:
We've got a lot of people from the leadership team from the Drupal Diversity & Inclusion Group, so Fatima Khalid, sugaroverflow, is the leader of the DDI group and she'll be there. As well as Tara King, also known as sparkling robots. Got some really great names for usernames and stuff, and then Alanna Burke, aburke626, and then Elli Ludwigson, ekl1773, and then me.
Marc Drummond:
So we'll be leading the presentation.
Mike Herchel:
Awesome. So that is on Wednesday all the way from 4:00 ... oh wait, no. Yeah.
Marc Drummond:
Yeah, it's Wednesday 4:00 to 5:30.
Mike Herchel:
Wednesday 4:00 to 5:30.
Marc Drummond:
And we also have a booth for DDI the following day at 1:45 to 2:15, if people want to stop by there in the exhibit hall. And on the contribution day, we'll be doing some contributions for DDI related things.
Marc Drummond:
We actually have a whole contrib team that we do things year round, and we can help people get connected with that. We've been working on ... this gender field module is one of the big things that we work on, but we've been trying to help people get connected and as a way to get people from underrepresented groups get involved with the contribution, and we do that year round.
Marc Drummond:
There's a way for people to get connected with that on contribution day. And people also help with our website, drupaldiversity.com,. We'd love to help people get connected with that. Some of our other initiatives that we work on throughout the year, we have some exciting things we're working on, we got a careers initiative, I'm helping to lead a speaker's initiative, we've just got our contrib team, I'm gonna forgot things, but we've got a lot of cool things.
Mike Herchel:
That's awesome.
Matt Kleve:
That's great.
Marc Drummond:
Yeah, we got weekly meetings. You can find out all about that on our website. Got a twitter account, @drupaldiversity. People can learn about our work, and yeah.
Mike Herchel:
Alright, well thanks, Marc.
Marc Drummond:
Sure. And we just got a new thing started where ... we're a scrappy group trying to make a change in the community, and on our website we now have a way where people can donate money to support our things like our booth at DrupalCon. People can now donate money to support our work at drupaldiversity.com.
Matt Kleve:
Outstanding.
Marc Drummond:
So I hope people come by to our session.
Mike Herchel:
That's awesome, yeah I will try to be there and then directly after that is Sally's session at 5:30 to 6:00 which you already heard about, so everybody needs to go there and maybe heckle her.
Marc Drummond:
Celebrate her work.
Mike Herchel:
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.
Sally Young:
You can heckle me.
Mike Herchel:
Yeah, yeah, yeah. We'll see about that Sally.
Matt Kleve:
So Mike, we have a few minutes left. Let's do lightening round just real quick. One thing that everybody who's on the call here wants to see at DrupalCon or something that is exciting them about DrupalCon Seattle.
Mike Herchel:
Can I go first?
Matt Kleve:
Sure.
Mike Herchel:
Alright, I'm an organizer of Florida Drupal Camp, we have our dates now for next year which is February 20th through ... I think 23rd, 2020.
Matt Kleve:
Shameless plug.
Mike Herchel:
We have the coolest stickers ever printed.
Mike Herchel:
They are like, kind of rainbow metallic with the sticker material on there, and they look so cool. We have 1,500 of these printed out, so of course we're gonna be handing a lot of these out DrupalCon, and then we're going to be giving packs of these stickers to people to take back to their camps to help promote Florida Drupal Camp, and let me tell you.
Mike Herchel:
These stickers, when I was doing the design ... I was helping with the design ... I was like "these are either gonna be the ugliest stickers ever, or they're gonna be the most awesome stickers ever," and I'm really happy that they're the most awesome. So that's one of the things I'm excited about.
Matt Kleve:
You're excited about swag. That's cool.
Mike Herchel:
I'm excited about giving out swag. I'm excited about giving out swag.
Matt Kleve:
Right on. Karen, any thoughts?
Karen Stevenson:
I mean, the obvious one, right? Seeing everybody and it's really fun, especially if you're working on little corners of a special module, that you're interested in, or some sort of subject area, it's just so great to have a chance to hook up with other people that are interested in the same thing and sort of see where it could go. Looking forward to that.
Matt Kleve:
Very good. Greg Dunlap.
Greg Dunlap:
I'm just really looking forward to seeing all my friends from the Drupal community. When you've been involved in the community as long as I, and some people even longer, like Karen, you've really developed some deep friendships in the community and I just really look forward to seeing and catching up and hanging out with everybody whenever DrupalCon time comes around.
Matt Kleve:
Zeqi Vázquezz.
Zequi Vázquez:
I am looking forward to going to Seattle. This will be my first time in the city, and I am looking forward to meet everyone there in Seattle, and hang out and enjoy the company because DrupalCon is about community, or it should be. And that's it.
Matt Kleve:
Joe Shindelar.
Joe Shindelar:
I'm looking forward to talking to people about Drupal 9. This is kind of like ... we've got this DrupalCon and then one more, but the next one in 2020, is just a couple months before Drupal 9 is released, so I'm hoping forward to hearing about people's plans for it.
Karen Stevenson:
Wow, you know it's kind of mind-boggling.
Joe Shindelar:
Right? It's crazy.
Greg Dunlap:
That was ... just hearing the words Drupal 9 was really triggering.
Matt Kleve:
I think it kinda raised my blood pressure.
Joe Shindelar:
I'm looking forward to saying Drupal 9 around Greg a lot and seeing ...
Matt Kleve:
Mark Drummond.
Marc Drummond:
Last night I put together my schedule for DrupalCon for what sessions I'm going to go attend. And there were so many ...
Matt Kleve:
You're very organized.
Marc Drummond:
There's a lot of great sessions I'm going to go to related to diversity and inclusion and community.
Marc Drummond:
The thing that helped me to do that is Alana Burke, who is helping to lead our session, she's been tweeting out session recommendations. Her twitter account is @aburke626, and she's been sharing good sessions related to diversity and inclusion. She has a lot of great stuff about guinea pigs, which is awesome.
Marc Drummond:
She's also got a spreadsheet that we share in our DDI meetings in Slack, so. So that's a great way to help connect with the some of those things that are related to those topics. Or you can use the tags on the DrupalCon page to find those sorts of things.
Matt Kleve:
Very cool. That's great. Sally Young, any final thoughts? Or what are you excited about?
Sally Young:
I hope this doesn't sound odd. I'm actually excited about it being over because I have so much stuff to do that week.
Sally Young:
I feel like I'm going to be running around with my hair on fire. I guess I'm looking forward to the contribution meander the most because then I won't have any talks to give or anything to organize and I can just sit down and do some work on my initiative which will be lovely, and then actually, afterwards, because I've never been to Seattle before so I'm very excited about that. I'm going to go and look at some Twin Peaks stuff in the area. Very excited about that. And of course seeing all of you.
Matt Kleve:
Fish throwing and coffee and stuff too?
Mike Herchel:
Cherry pie.
Sally Young:
Going to have some pie and coffee.
Matt Kleve:
For me, Mike, I think I'm excited to go back to DrupalCon. I've taken a couple off, and I haven't been to a DrupalCon since New Orleans, so I'm looking forward to Seattle. It's also my first trip to Seattle. Should be great. I always learn what I didn't know when I go to a DrupalCon, and sometimes those things are eyeopening.
Mike Herchel:
So you learn a lot.
Matt Kleve:
Usually. Thanks everybody for coming on.
Mike Herchel:
Yeah, thanks everyone.
Karen Stevenson:
Bye.
Matt Kleve:
Bye.
Greg Dunlap:
Bye.
Sally Young:
Bye.
Zequi Vázquez:
Bye.
Matt Kleve:
Bye.
Joe Shindelar:
Bye.
Sally Young:
Do we actually leave the call now or?

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About host Mike Herchel

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Front-end Developer, community organizer, Drupal lover, and astronomy enthusiast

About host Matt Kleve

Portrait of Matt Kleve
Matt Kleve has been a Drupal developer since 2007. His previous work in the media sparks a desire to create lean, easy to use workflow processes.